Not Guilty!

In Traditional Chinese Medicine disturbances in our emotional life are considered to be a major cause of illness. If healthy emotions are ones which are appropriate to the situation we are in, an unhealthy response is one that is not so appropriate, either excessive, inadequate, or just not fitting. Such responses if they are ongoing or habitual lead to illness.

So, for example, there are situations where it is healthy and appropriate to be angry, but if our anger is out of all proportion to the situation, or we are always angry and always on the edge of losing our temper, then not only will this be distressing to those around us, and to ourself, but also it will over time make us ill.

Traditionally, emotions which can cause problems by becoming excessive or ingrained are anger, sadness and grief, fear, excitement and pensiveness. But what about something like guilt? Guilt plays a significant role in the lives of many people, but is not mentioned in traditional lists.

What, anyway, is guilt, and how might it be a factor in our health? We might suspect that in the modern world there is some confusion about this, as ideas about what is right and wrong have changed considerably in a relatively short space of time. Guilt is a feeling we have when we have done something wrong, or rather when we have done something that we consider to be wrong. Of course, this may equally apply to something that we have not done but feel we ought to have done. Perhaps we feel remorseful, that we have let ourselves and others down. But on the other hand, it is noticeable that quite a few people seem to feel guilty when they do not seem to have done anything to be guilty about.

Some people, for instance, feel guilty if they have a rest. They feel that they ought to be doing something, almost as if they can only justify their very existence by being useful. They may drive themselves into the ground, always working and busy and useful, to the detriment of their overall health, simply because they would feel guilty if they stopped. Of course this can be a convenient failing for others – family members, co-workers or bosses – who may come to rely on the guilty person’s addiction to work and usefulness.

It is important for such a person to realise that they are being driven by this irrational guilt; it is important to acknowledge that it is not healthy, not a good thing. This might be difficult, because  it may look, both to the individual themselves and to others (especially ones with a vested interest), as if they are making a valuable contribution by being so busy.

Such a person may in fact need to learn to waste time, as shocking as that may sound! They need to learn that they do not need to justify themselves by being busy, and they may also need to learn to say ‘no’, sometimes, to family members, co-workers and bosses.

Acupuncture treatment is a good first step for such a person, if for no other reason than it involves them spending an hour or so of their time not being busy (and 20 minutes or more of that time lying down to boot!). But beyond that,  acupuncture can work at a deeper level of the psyche, helping  them  perhaps to  realise that they do not have to justify themselves by work and busy-ness, and that they need not feel guilty if, from time to time, they have periods of uselessness!

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